Art shop – Carolina Belles http://carolinabelles.net/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 15:38:09 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://carolinabelles.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-25-141x136.png Art shop – Carolina Belles http://carolinabelles.net/ 32 32 The new Front Street art shop opens with pride https://carolinabelles.net/the-new-front-street-art-shop-opens-with-pride/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 08:30:00 +0000 https://carolinabelles.net/the-new-front-street-art-shop-opens-with-pride/ A new queer and trans-owned business on Front Street is cultivating creativity and promoting pride in downtown Coupeville. Meet Market is part art supply store, part public studio, part community center, and its owners hope it will also be a haven for anyone who needs a safe place to be themselves. The store’s founders, partners […]]]>

A new queer and trans-owned business on Front Street is cultivating creativity and promoting pride in downtown Coupeville.

Meet Market is part art supply store, part public studio, part community center, and its owners hope it will also be a haven for anyone who needs a safe place to be themselves.

The store’s founders, partners Andrew Ziehl and Cade Roach, moved to Coupeville about six years ago. Although they have been living in town for a relatively short time, the couple are deeply involved in the community; Roach serves as Vice Chairman of the Coupeville Historic Waterfront Association and Ziehl sits on the board of the Evey’s Landing National Historic Reserve.

Meet Market has been in the works for a long time. Roach and Ziehl had floated the idea of ​​a community space for about three years before the company’s official opening, which took place on May 27.

The market is open from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Mondays, Thursdays and Sundays; 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday; and 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday. During retail hours, anyone can enter the store or drop by the back garden of the building to relax and make art at no cost. Free and shared art materials are available in the market for people to use, provided by donations.

“We aim to stock quality supplies for both tourists and our community,” Ziehl said. “Someone can come in, grab some art supplies, sit and paint in our back patio, or stroll down Front Street and make some art from one of the amazing views.”

After hours, the market hosts classes and workshops led by local artists. Current offerings, including a ‘walk-in draw’ for teens and a ‘heART journals’ workshop, are all art-focused, though Roach said the market is open to accepting teachers having knowledge in a variety of subjects such as native plants or the island. the story.

“It doesn’t have to be anything artistic,” Roach said. “We just want to create a space where people who know interesting niche topics can come and tell other members of the community about them.”

The couple’s vision for the space is that there will always be something new to explore, without the pressure of a major commitment of time or money. Roach said they try to keep all of their offerings affordable and are willing to cover costs for those who otherwise couldn’t afford to attend workshops in the marketplace.

But Ziehl and Roach want the space to be more than just a business; they also hope it will be a safe and empowering place for all who enter.

In the three weeks since opening the business, it has already seen great success on this front.

On opening day, Roach and Ziehl hung a Pride flag in front of their store – the first Pride flag Roach had seen in the historic Coupeville neighborhood since arriving. Within a week, Roach said, other Pride flags began popping up all over downtown.

The first weekend the market was open, children and teenagers flocked and started to get creative. Parents were amazed, Roach added, and many said their children were generally not so quick to open up, relax or express themselves.

It was exactly what the owners hoped for.

“We really wanted to create a space that was like, you can walk in and be yourself and not only feel safe, but feel recognized for who you are, like you don’t have to hide any part of yourself- same,” Roach said. “…If someone had done this for me when I was younger, it wouldn’t have taken me 30 years to realize my identity.”

Roach and Ziehl are both queer, and Roach is transgender and non-binary. For them, demonstrating to store visitors who may struggle with their own identity that they can have families, own businesses and live the life they dream of without compromising their authenticity is an important part of Meet Market’s mission.

To that end, Meet Market is hosting a small Pride Festival, which is happening this weekend. The event kicked off on Friday June 17 and will continue through Sunday June 19, with collaborative art projects, live music, puzzles and board games, art workshops, and yoga on Sunday mornings. A full schedule of this weekend’s Pride events can be found on Meet Market’s Instagram page @heymeetmarket.

Roach said it was the first Coupeville Pride event the couple had seen since moving to town, and they hoped to involve more Front Street businesses in the years to come.

Meet Market is located at 7 Front Street in Coupeville.

Visitors to Meet Market get creative in the open studio space, using donated art supplies that the market makes available to the public. (Photo provided)

Front Street's newest venture, Meet Market, sells art supplies and other creative products.  (Photo by Karina Andrew/Whidbey News-Times)

Front Street’s newest venture, Meet Market, sells art supplies and other creative products. (Photo by Karina Andrew/Whidbey News-Times)

Andrew Ziehl, center, and Cade Roach stand outside their new business, Meet Market, with their daughter, Eliot.  (Photo provided)

Andrew Ziehl, center, and Cade Roach stand outside their new business, Meet Market, with their daughter, Eliot. (Photo provided)

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Johnny Depp spotted in a British art shop during the suspension of the trial of Amber Heard https://carolinabelles.net/johnny-depp-spotted-in-a-british-art-shop-during-the-suspension-of-the-trial-of-amber-heard/ Thu, 12 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://carolinabelles.net/johnny-depp-spotted-in-a-british-art-shop-during-the-suspension-of-the-trial-of-amber-heard/ Johnny Depp took a selfie with an admiring fan at a UK print shop this week – as he enjoys the break in his libel trial against ex-wife Amber Heard. The ‘Pirates of the Caribbean’ star was shopping for art prints and picture frames at an East Sussex shop called King and McGaw at around […]]]>

Johnny Depp took a selfie with an admiring fan at a UK print shop this week – as he enjoys the break in his libel trial against ex-wife Amber Heard.

The ‘Pirates of the Caribbean’ star was shopping for art prints and picture frames at an East Sussex shop called King and McGaw at around 5 p.m. Wednesday, Emma Wishart, whose husband, Stephen, works in the shop.

“Unfortunately I wasn’t there, but my husband was thrilled!” Wishart said in a post Thursday.

Her husband and Depp took a photo together, showing the two smiling men and the actor with his hands on the shopkeeper’s shoulders.

Depp “was very nice and relaxed and they talked about guitars,” she said, adding that the actor hadn’t bought anything but could return.

In the selfie, what wish posted on TwitterDepp is pictured wearing sunglasses, which he often kept in the courtroom during his highly-watched trial in Fairfax, Virginia.

A representative for Depp, 58, confirmed to the Post on Thursday that the actor is indeed in Sussex.

The Wisharts “both look up to him very much,” Emma said, but “are a bit old for too much adoration.”

Although she did not follow the trial very closely, “of course it was impossible not to hear anything at all”, added the Briton.

“I don’t like their private lives displayed for public entertainment and I haven’t read or watched anything on purpose.”

Johnny Depp took a selfie with a fan at a British print shop as his defamation lawsuit against his ex-wife Amber Heard goes to recess this week.
@CéphéeElf
According to a source close to Depp, the actor spent the trial break while vacationing overseas.
According to a source close to Depp, the actor spent the trial break while vacationing overseas.
Jim Lo Scalzo/Pool Photo via AP

The Post exclusively reported on Wednesday that Depp was overseas while the court proceedings were on vacation.

“Johnny is in Europe to take time off to rest for a few days, hang out with old friends, play music and take long walks in the countryside,” a source close to him said.

The ‘Edward Scissorhands’ actor sued Heard, 36, for $50 million for defamation over a 2018 Washington Post opinion piece she wrote in which she called herself “a personality representing domestic violence”.

Heard did not name Depp in the essay. But his lawyers say it still smeared him – and cost him millions – because he was clearly referring to domestic abuse allegations Heard made when she filed for divorce in 2016.

Heard's testimony will continue when the trial resumes on May 16 in Fairfax, Va.
Heard’s testimony will continue when the trial resumes on May 16 in Fairfax, Va.
Photo by JIM LO SCALZO/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

The latest from the Johnny Depp libel lawsuit:


The “Aquaman” actress has hit back with his own $100 million countersuit alleging Depp is waging a “smear campaign” to ruin his life.

The two fought in a Virginia court for four weeks over the claims, although proceedings were halted on May 5, after Heard’s second day on the stand, and will resume Monday.

Just before his 2020 libel suit against Britain’s Sun newspaper failed, Depp traveled to Sussex to play music with his friend Jeff Beck and prepare for the case, according to a report at the time.

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Jay’s Art Shop celebrates 50 years | Business https://carolinabelles.net/jays-art-shop-celebrates-50-years-business/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 16:26:00 +0000 https://carolinabelles.net/jays-art-shop-celebrates-50-years-business/ BENNINGTON — Jay’s Art Shop & Frame Gallery celebrated its 50th anniversary on Friday with a 50% off sale, an honorary ribbon cutting and lots of support downtown. Jenny Dewar of Better Bennington Corp. presented a plaque to Jay and Joan Zwynenburg and said a few words in honor of Bennington’s long-standing business. She described […]]]>

BENNINGTON — Jay’s Art Shop & Frame Gallery celebrated its 50th anniversary on Friday with a 50% off sale, an honorary ribbon cutting and lots of support downtown.

Jenny Dewar of Better Bennington Corp. presented a plaque to Jay and Joan Zwynenburg and said a few words in honor of Bennington’s long-standing business. She described the first time the BBC took her to meet Zwynenburg.

“Jay walked us through each aisle and showed us everything. They took us downstairs to the framing shop… we were instantly charmed by Jay,” she said.

Several members of the BBC, City Manager Stuart Hurd and several other members of the community were present at the honorary opening.

Zwynenburg, who is about to turn 90, opened Jay’s Art Shop on May 1, 1972 with his wife, Joan. They met in 1955 on the campus of the University of Vermont. Jay said, “I winked at her, and she smiled, and the rest is history.”

Zwynenburg worked for IBM in New York before deciding to give up his top-floor corner office to buy a bookstore at 416 Main St. Zwynenburg said his colleagues refused to believe he was leaving the company for a bookstore, so he “came here and took pictures of us” for evidence.

Eventually, Zwynenburg had seven different stores, including the Bennington Bookstore. Over time, he sold them all except one – Jay’s Art Shop & Frame Gallery. But even that has been reduced. An art gallery once existed above the shop, but it has been converted into condos. Yet underneath the shop is their in-house framing studio, where they create custom frames for clients.

During his time as a business owner in Bennington, the biggest hurdle Zwynenburg said he had to overcome was the interest rates of the 1980s. He had what he called “large bank loans” and he worried about rising prime rates, even though his bills were always paid on time.

Other than that, he said, “it’s just – I wouldn’t say smooth sailing but – smooth sailing.”

It’s been 50 years, but Zwynenburg said he “can’t go on forever.” He hopes someone will eventually take over the business, buy the inventory and “do him justice”.

“It was a really nice ride,” he said. “It’s hard to believe that 50 years have passed so quickly.”

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Jay’s Art Shop & Frame Gallery celebrates 50 years • Greylock Glass https://carolinabelles.net/jays-art-shop-frame-gallery-celebrates-50-years-greylock-glass/ Thu, 14 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://carolinabelles.net/jays-art-shop-frame-gallery-celebrates-50-years-greylock-glass/ Editor’s Note: The following article is derived from officially released information, published with little or no editorial changes. Greylock glass occasionally provides our readers with such content if the information is factual in nature and requires little or no interpretation or analysis, often when the original story would provide little or no additional relevant information. […]]]>

Editor’s Note: The following article is derived from officially released information, published with little or no editorial changes. Greylock glass occasionally provides our readers with such content if the information is factual in nature and requires little or no interpretation or analysis, often when the original story would provide little or no additional relevant information.

BENNINGTON—The Better Bennington Corporation will contribute to the celebration of Jay’s Art Shop and Frame Galleryof the 50th anniversary of with a presentation and an honorary ribbon cutting on Friday, April 29 at 11 a.m. The event is free and open to the public.

Jay’s will be open from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. with their annual MEGA-sale of 50% off everything except framing. Their store offers a plethora of inventory ranging from clothing, umbrellas and maps to arts and crafts supplies and souvenirs. This sale is all the more incredible as they are doing it for the 50th time!

Jay and Joan Zwynenburg moved to Bennington from Pennsylvania in 1971 following Jay’s career as general manager. They fell in love with the city and decided to open a gift shop and framing gallery right in the middle of it all. They have been a staple in downtown Bennington ever since.

The public is invited to join in the celebration at 11:00 a.m. as the Zwynenburgs are honored for their dedication to downtown Bennington and for their impeccable service over the years to our entire community.

***

The mission of the Better Bennington Corporation is to lead and support public and private efforts that enhance downtown as a vital commercial and cultural heart of the community.

The Better Bennington Corporation (BBC) is committed to equity, diversity and inclusion and believes that these fundamental principles inform and strengthen the BBC’s ability to respond to changing demographics and the needs of anyone who lives, works or visits downtown Bennington.

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Isabel Roloff Reveals New Business Venture After Art Shop Closes https://carolinabelles.net/isabel-roloff-reveals-new-business-venture-after-art-shop-closes/ Thu, 17 Mar 2022 13:31:39 +0000 https://carolinabelles.net/isabel-roloff-reveals-new-business-venture-after-art-shop-closes/ LPBW Star Isabel Roloff has a new business after closing her art shop. What is she doing to provide income for the family now? Read on for all the details. Why LPBW a couple refuses to show the face of their newborn son Before Isabel and Jacob Roloff’s first child was born, they warned their […]]]>

LPBW Star Isabel Roloff has a new business after closing her art shop. What is she doing to provide income for the family now? Read on for all the details.

Why LPBW a couple refuses to show the face of their newborn son

Before Isabel and Jacob Roloff’s first child was born, they warned their social media followers that they would not share the baby’s face. Although Isabel documented many aspects of her pregnancy with the world, they decided to share too much.

Isabel Roloff/Credit: Jacob Roloff Instagram

The couple cited privacy as a reason not to blast baby Mateo’s face on social media. And so far, they have kept that promise. However, they share vague photos of their son.

Isabel Roloff has a new business

Although she doesn’t show Mateo’s face, Isabel Roloff is very active on her Instagram. She uses the platform to connect with followers, as well as to promote her new business.

She took to Instagram earlier this week to let fans know she had more openings for consultations for March. Consulting in what?

Jacob Roloff’s wife got into interior design. However, his designs are based on the Chinese practice of Feng Shui.

Consultations are done virtually. The interior design business isn’t Roloff’s first online venture.

Credit: Isabel Roloff Instagram

What happened to his art shop?

Interior design is just Isabel Roloff’s latest business move. She is also a writer and poet, previously selling postcards with poems on them. She was also working on a poetry book, which she put on hiatus during her pregnancy.

The multi-talented reality TV star is also an artist and singer.

In fact, Jacob and Isabel Roloff have their own creative company, Rock & Roloff. She previously had her own art shop on the company’s website. However, the instagram because the art shop now announces that it is closed until further notice.

The art shop‘s closure is likely due to the same reason her poetry book is on hold – it’s focused on raising baby Mateo.

However, her new interior design business has more flexibility than her previous ventures. Click here for more information on Isabel Roloff Interiors.

Have you booked a Feng Shui consultation with Isabel Roloff? Share your experience in the comments below.

bookmark TV shows to stay up to date with the latest news from Season 23 of LPBW. TLC has yet to share its plans for the new season.

Jennifer Havener
Last posts by Jennifer Havener (see everything)

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That Gallery in Basingstoke runs an art shop for Ukraine https://carolinabelles.net/that-gallery-in-basingstoke-runs-an-art-shop-for-ukraine/ Sat, 12 Mar 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://carolinabelles.net/that-gallery-in-basingstoke-runs-an-art-shop-for-ukraine/ Basingstoke’s AN ART gallery is calling on locals to get creative with Ukraine’s national flower to help provide lifesaving support to fleeing refugees. The curators who run That Gallery, which is about to reopen in Festival Place, are curating a pop-up shop with a very special twist. Rachel Davis, one of the gallery’s curators, calls […]]]>

Basingstoke’s AN ART gallery is calling on locals to get creative with Ukraine’s national flower to help provide lifesaving support to fleeing refugees.

The curators who run That Gallery, which is about to reopen in Festival Place, are curating a pop-up shop with a very special twist.

Rachel Davis, one of the gallery’s curators, calls on residents to do something creative using the theme of the sunflower, known as Ukraine’s national flower.

SEE MORE: Crocheted men stuck outside visa application center in Poland as they try to bring Ukrainian family to UK

She said: “I felt very strongly that the creative community, the local creative community, needed to come together and do something. There’s a lot going on nationally and globally in the wider community, but I thought we had to do something here and the timing of the gallery’s reopening got me thinking.

Rachel said she didn’t think it would be fair to hold a regular reopening of the gallery, after it closed in December last year.

She added; “It just wouldn’t fit in light of what’s going on, so I wanted to use the fact that we’re reopening as an opportunity. Everyone is invited to participate from other Festival Place retailers, other art groups and anyone who thinks they can paint, draw, sew or knit something sunflower themed which they can then donate for be auctioned.

Rachel hopes the sunflower theme will be a sign of hope.

She added: “They are the biggest producers of sunflowers in the world and a lot of our sunflower oil comes from Ukraine, so it’s just a nice symbol that it’s their national flower.

“I think sunflowers are a lot of people’s favorite flowers anyway and they just represent cheerfulness and that’s lacking in the world right now. I think they will also look very impactful when all displayed together.

READ MORE: Longtime theater volunteer shares concerns over Haymarket’s future

The Festival Place customer service lounge will now serve as a drop-off point for anyone who wishes to submit creative sunflower-themed artwork.

She also hopes to organize workshops for children to come and make sunflower-themed artwork.

She added: “It’s really about getting the community behind it and a lot of people have made practical donations, but actually it could be a nice way for the community to come together to do something to help people. others.”

The money raised from the sale of the art will be donated to help Ukrainian refugees.

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Project 431 Art Boutique Opening Reception https://carolinabelles.net/project-431-art-boutique-opening-reception/ Tue, 08 Mar 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://carolinabelles.net/project-431-art-boutique-opening-reception/ A number of artists are opening a new exhibition at 431 Ellicott Street – the gallery space next to Fitz Books and Waffles. Called Project 431, artists featuring their work include Jonathan Bishop, DJ Carr, Robert Harris, Kyla Kegler, Phillip Kuznicki and Sufana Wajed. This new space, adjoining Fitz, has become a hotspot for artists […]]]>

A number of artists are opening a new exhibition at 431 Ellicott Street – the gallery space next to Fitz Books and Waffles. Called Project 431, artists featuring their work include Jonathan Bishop, DJ Carr, Robert Harris, Kyla Kegler, Phillip Kuznicki and Sufana Wajed.

This new space, adjoining Fitz, has become a hotspot for artists looking to set up shop in places that aren’t considered traditional gallery spaces. Since bursting onto the scene, it has temporarily housed The Space Between (by UB Arts Collaboratory), Eat Off Art (orchestrated by Edreys and Alexa Wajed), and is now essentially used as an annex gallery that plays on the bookstore (and waffles) .

Speaking of waffles, if you haven’t had a chance to try one of Aaron Bartley’s Liege waffles, you don’t know what you’re missing.

And if you’re planning on heading to Project 431’s opening reception, be sure to make time to stop by Realm, a few doors down.

“Join us for a toast at the Project 431 Opening Reception! This Friday, March 11, from 6-9 p.m. in the nearby Fitz Books and Waffles Gallery 431 Ellicott St. Buffalo NY 14203. This will be the opening of a 6-month art exhibition/shop of rotating works by: I’ll have some of my Assess and False deep series this Friday, alongside an intriguing and eclectic collection of works by my fellow exhibitors. – Kyla Kegler

See the Facebook event

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How a Whitley Bay art shop became a gem in the local community https://carolinabelles.net/how-a-whitley-bay-art-shop-became-a-gem-in-the-local-community/ Sun, 27 Feb 2022 10:01:07 +0000 https://carolinabelles.net/how-a-whitley-bay-art-shop-became-a-gem-in-the-local-community/ A beloved beachfront art shop in Whitley Bay celebrated its fifth anniversary this month. For The Love of The North is one of the region’s creative leaders. Their store features the work of local artists and the owners, Paul and Lucy Hull, are still active in the community. Register to our NewcastleWorld Today newsletter The […]]]>

A beloved beachfront art shop in Whitley Bay celebrated its fifth anniversary this month.

For The Love of The North is one of the region’s creative leaders. Their store features the work of local artists and the owners, Paul and Lucy Hull, are still active in the community.

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The passion project launched online in 2017 but quickly turned into a boutique and now, five years later, For The Love of The North takes pride of place on the Whitley Bay seafront.

Since its conception, the store has supported over 70 local artists, raised £15,000 for charity and won Best Newcomer at the Great Gift Retailer Awards 2020 for the Midlands, North and Scotland.

The store is also a Living Wage certified employer and has hired three people through the Kick Start initiative.

As for The Love of The North celebrating its fifth anniversary, NewcastleWorld heads to Whitley Bay to meet owner Paul and learn the story behind the shop.

Paul said: “I used to work for North Tyneside Council. I used to run the borough’s tourist information centers but, like so many across the country, they have been cut.

“Lucy and I knew there was a wealth of talent in the region with artists and creatives.

“We also knew that there was a huge sense of pride in the area and that people love their home here.

Lucy and Paul run the shop together

“I took my dismissal from the board, which is one of the best things I’ve ever done, and we launched the website on Valentine’s Day in 2017.”

This launch day helped influence the name of For The Love of North and it was the online store first.

Soon the opening of a store in the center of Whitley Bay appeared in the summer of 2017 and the couple jumped at the chance.

A few years later, just before 2019, the store moved to Spanish City on the waterfront.

Since then, of course, there has been the pandemic, but Paul has seen even more desire to buy local.

He said: “People have really embraced local shopping.

“They realized that everything they needed was on their doorstep.

“What’s been lovely with us is that people know that Lucy and I are husband and wife and that’s our livelihood, but we also support artists and creatives from across the North East.

People put in store fingerprints during lockdown

“By buying from us, you’re not just supporting us, but the artists and it all goes back into the local economy.”

Paul also goes on to say how “thrilled” he is to now be able to employ local people in the store.

The owner praises his “fabulous” team and recognizes the benefits of the Kick Start program for hiring and developing local youth.

During the lockdowns, For The Love of The North started selling designs of local areas with rainbows, donating the proceeds to the Northumbria NHS Bright Charity which amounted to over £10,000.

Paul said: “It was wonderful, especially during this first lockdown, to see these [the prints] at Whitley Bay.

“It was really uplifting.”

You can visit For The Love of The North at Unit 2, Spanish City and online here.

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The Sheffield art shop that has stood in the picture for 164 years https://carolinabelles.net/the-sheffield-art-shop-that-has-stood-in-the-picture-for-164-years/ Mon, 31 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://carolinabelles.net/the-sheffield-art-shop-that-has-stood-in-the-picture-for-164-years/ Queen Victoria was, surprisingly, still three years from the throne when Hibbert Brothers opened their gallery and fine art shop on Norfolk Street in 1834. As an advertisement for the company in 1979 proudly proclaimed: “In 1888, when Vincent van Gogh lost the balance of his mind and his left ear, Hibbert Brothers had been […]]]>

Queen Victoria was, surprisingly, still three years from the throne when Hibbert Brothers opened their gallery and fine art shop on Norfolk Street in 1834.

As an advertisement for the company in 1979 proudly proclaimed: “In 1888, when Vincent van Gogh lost the balance of his mind and his left ear, Hibbert Brothers had been quietly selling beautiful original oil paintings for 54 years. “

The business, selling artists’ pictures and materials, had survived two world wars and weathered two recessions.

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HIBBERTS Pictured is Paul Hibbert-Greaves in Hibbert Brothers in Norfolk Street, Sheffield, which is due to close on March 17, 1998 after 164 years in business

But, unfortunately, it could not survive what was described at the time as the constant upheaval caused by downtown redevelopment. Sound familiar?

Paul Hibbert-Greaves – great-great-grandson of founder William Hibbert – could have spoken now when he spoke about the shutdown nearly 24 years ago.

“There is no future in the city centre,” lamented Paul, who apparently did not hesitate to criticize the city council at the time.

“The whole problem is that people don’t shop in the center anymore.”

One of the new junctions came into use at the junction of Norfolk Street and Surrey Street, Sheffield – 26th June 1968 Hibbert Brothers

He blamed ‘massive’ council-imposed rent hikes and added: ‘The rot started in 1994 with restrictions on Surrey Street which affected us significantly.

“People don’t come downtown with cars anymore.”

Some things never change…

Fast forward to October 2021 and Elaine Bird of Bird Opticians on Surrey Street told a full council meeting how footfall at her business had dropped by 40% since Pinstone Street was closed to traffic.

Hibbert Brothers

In November 1998 Hibberts had opened a gallery in Bakewell – and Paul seemed pleased with the different clientele being attracted.

“Our customers come from Cheshire, Sutton Coldfield, even Birmingham, and they seem a little better off. Back in Sheffield, no matter how much the ticket was, people would offer you half of it. Here, they say ‘it’s going to be fine’.

The people of Sheffield then, as now, have always had an eye for a bargain.

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Dot Line Curve Creations Gift Gallery Art Store Opening in Gardner https://carolinabelles.net/dot-line-curve-creations-gift-gallery-art-store-opening-in-gardner/ Mon, 24 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://carolinabelles.net/dot-line-curve-creations-gift-gallery-art-store-opening-in-gardner/ GARDNER – A new downtown boutique aims to shine a spotlight on local artists. William Caouette and Paula Abare, a married couple from Ashburnham, quietly opened the Dot Line Curve Creations Gift Gallery at 33 Parker St. just before Christmas. “We’ve been artists most of our lives,” said Caouette, who said the couple needed a […]]]>

GARDNER – A new downtown boutique aims to shine a spotlight on local artists.

William Caouette and Paula Abare, a married couple from Ashburnham, quietly opened the Dot Line Curve Creations Gift Gallery at 33 Parker St. just before Christmas.

“We’ve been artists most of our lives,” said Caouette, who said the couple needed a new place to display their work after outgrowing their home’s small shed. “So we found this place and it’s just perfect.”

They began contacting other local artists and asking if they would be interested in renting a display case in the store to sell their own artwork, and Caouette said the couple immediately received a positive response. Crates rent for $25 a week and the artist receives 100% of his sales, he said.

“They love it,” Caouette said of the artists who rented space at the boutique. “A lot of people have their art just sitting in a corner of a room, so this store gives them a place to show off their art.”

The store’s name is an attempt to distill the essence of all art to its foundations, according to Caouette.

“Every work of art, everything that is made, is just made from a point, a line or a curve – nothing else,” he said.

Exhibits include handcrafted jewelry, paintings, sculptures, woodcarvings, dreamcatchers, and antiques. There is a wide variety of artwork in the store, including several pieces with Native American and Japanese themes. He said all local artists are encouraged to inquire about renting a showcase.

“We want all kinds of art here,” Caouette said, adding that there is a large community of artists in the Greater Gardner area. “But most artists don’t really have an outlet to sell their work. This store will give them an outlet.

Although the store has operated primarily by word of mouth for the past few weeks, Caouette said a storefront sign will be erected soon and a grand opening event is being planned. He added that public reaction so far has been positive and that he appreciates the support of his fellow business owners.

“That’s one of the reasons we wanted to come to Gardner, because it’s a great place to do business and the downtown area is growing,” he said. “They’re redoing the roads and improving the area, and we wanted to be part of that.”

In addition to exhibiting artwork, public classes held in the store’s basement and taught by local artists will soon be available, according to Caouette.

“Classes will be for all levels, from beginners to advanced, and students will learn all kinds of art forms,” ​​he said.

Among those exhibiting work at the store is Elie Bastarache, an award-winning artist from Winchendon. He said the store presents a unique opportunity for the local arts community.

“I think it’s the best thing that ever happened for us artists,” said Bastarache, who specializes in painting, sculpture and sculpture. “Many of us dream and wish we could put our art in galleries, but they usually want a high commission. So you don’t stand a chance, especially a starving artist. But this store is a godsend for artists trying to make it.

Caouette said he hopes his store will provide customers with a unique local shopping or browsing experience.

“Everything is different here,” he says. “No two pieces are the same, even the jewelry.”

Caouette said he is working on setting up a phone line and a social media account, but for now anyone interested in exhibiting his work is welcome to stop by the shop.

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